Quick Answer: What Are The Cancer Waiting Time Targets?

What is the waiting time for cancer treatment?

Waiting times You should not have to wait more than 2 weeks to see a specialist if your GP suspects you have cancer and urgently refers you.

In cases where cancer has been confirmed, you should not have to wait more than 31 days from the decision to treat to the start of treatment..

What is the 2 week wait cancer?

What is a ‘Two Week Wait’ referral? A ‘Two Week Wait’ referral is a request from your General Practitioner (GP) to ask the hospital for an urgent appointment for you, because you have symptoms that might indicate that you have cancer.

What is the 2 week rule NHS?

An urgent two-week referral means that you will be offered an appointment with a hospital specialist within 2 weeks of your General Practitioner (GP) making the referral. As of April 1st 2010 you have a legal right to be seen by a specialist within this time.

What is the 7 warning signs of cancer?

These are potential cancer symptoms:Change in bowel or bladder habits.A sore that does not heal.Unusual bleeding or discharge.Thickening or lump in the breast or elsewhere.Indigestion or difficulty in swallowing.Obvious change in a wart or mole.Nagging cough or hoarseness.

How quick can cancer spread?

Scientists have found that for most breast and bowel cancers, the tumours begin to grow around ten years before they’re detected. And for prostate cancer, tumours can be many decades old. “They’ve estimated that one tumour was 40 years old. Sometimes the growth can be really slow,” says Graham.

How long should you wait for an NHS appointment?

The current waiting times standards are: 18 weeks Referral to Treatment Standard. 12 weeks for new outpatient appointments. 6 weeks for the eight key diagnostic tests and investigations.

What are cancer waiting times?

In England, Scotland and Northern Ireland the current targets are: no more than 2 months (62 days) wait between the date the hospital receives an urgent referral for suspected cancer and the start of treatment.

What is the cancer patient pathway?

A Cancer Pathway is a PATIENT PATHWAY. A Cancer Pathway is the PATIENT’s journey from the initial suspicion of cancer through Clinical Investigations, PATIENT DIAGNOSIS and treatment. This could be by: Initial referral to a hospital specialist by the PATIENT’s GENERAL PRACTITIONER.

Can you have cancer and feel fine?

Cancer is always a painful disease, so if you feel fine, you don’t have cancer. Many types of cancer cause little to no pain, especially in the early stages.

What is the 31 day cancer target?

The target, for all cancer treatment types, is for at least 96% of patients to start a first treatment for a new primary cancer within one month (31 days) of the decision to treat.

How long can you live with cancer untreated?

A small but definite proportion of patients survive for more than five years with untreated cancers of the uterine cer vix, buccal cavity, and stomach.

Can I sue NHS for waiting times?

More patients may suffer harm and sue the NHS as waiting times for treatment continue to grow, the National Audit Office (NAO) has warned. Around 40% of NHS compensation claims are already due to delays in treatment or diagnosis, but this could rise if people are left on long waiting lists, it said.

What is patient pathway in the NHS?

The specific route that a particular PATIENT takes from the first REFERRAL REQUEST RECEIVED DATE of a SERVICE REQUEST or the ACTIVITY DATE of the first emergency ACTIVITY where there is no related SERVICE REQUEST.

What to do when you get diagnosed with cancer?

Here are important steps you can take to manage your life after a cancer diagnosis:Find a partner. “No one should go through a fight against cancer alone,” says Visel. … Get organized. … Get informed. … Be sure to consult only unbiased, trustworthy sources when you do your research. … Consider a second opinion.

Is private health care better than NHS?

One of the advantages of private healthcare is that it allows users to have a choice of consultants, hospitals and treatments, but an NHS constitution mirrors this: ‘Everyone who is cared for by the NHS in England has formal rights to make choices about the service that they receive.